Meanwhile, Boston activists are also preparing in Missouri, where Rev. Osagyefo Uhuru Sekou of the First Baptist Church in Jamaica Plain has been teaching nonviolent disobedience tactics to protesters. For a glimpse of the ground through some local eyes, we reached out to Boston organizer Terry Marshall of the protest arts outfit Intelligent Mischief. He spent last night on the St. Louis side of things with fellow activist Liz Padgett, and shared his experience with the Dig:

“There was a lot of waiting. Then when the verdict happened, there were two calls to action. First [one organization] told people to head to the Ferguson Police Department, and that was the biggest gathering point. Also a group called South Side Solidarity, which is largely a group of white people who live in St. Louis, had a second call to go to the site of where [Vonderrick Myers Jr.] was killed. We went to the latter; it was closer to where we were staying. You probably didn’t see it on the news but …

“At first about 200 people started marching, and the police were pretty much leaving people alone, and then people started marching toward the highway …

“They were literally just letting people march and backing off. Then, the march had grown to nearly 500 people, and they took over a highway. Police later came, they brought out a tank, they brought out riot gear. Police gave a lawful order to disperse, then people started marching near an intersection near a safe space …

“A tank came and started speeding up, and they were shooting smoke bombs. Some people retreated into the safe space, and then after a long while the police retreated. We thought it was over, and then around 1am we went back to the apartment that was hosting us, and police came back [to the safe space], and the tank came back and started shooting more smoke bombs. No one was outside, but they also started shooting tear gas. Liz went outside and experienced the tear gas. They trapped people inside the safe space, and they just kept shooting tear gas. After about a half an hour or an hour or so, they left …

“Right now there are actions to shut down Clayton, which is the [county seat] of St. Louis. People are forming groups and doing nonviolent actions there. We’re going to get some rest, since we were up until 4am, but then we’re headed right back out.”

Read the article in its entirety at DigBoston

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