Comment

Float Like a Butterfly, Sting Like a Bee

 

Muhammad Ali has so much to be remembered for. Particularly as a black, Muslim, creative and athlete he has been a hero and inspiration to us at IM. Travelling, resisting, creating spectacle, Ali shifted narrative in his language and movement in so many ways. He was easily one of the most captivating public figures in Diasporadical history. We love him a lot because he embodies the two pronged approach of narrative and design, rhetoric and action. He would use poetic language and do amazing things in the ring. In one of his most well-known quotes Ali describes his prettiness and his dangerousness: “Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. The hands can’t hit what the eyes can’t see.” In this regard he was the ultimate trickster! In 2017, we want to be like Ali, pretty, beautiful even, and dangerous, sharp, poisonous to some. So we did some strategic thinking…

During the last few weeks of 2016 we all came together to celebrate our past year of work, learn deeply what each of us was envisioning for our lives in 2017 and to breathe our 2017 plans for Intelligent Mischief into being.

After spending some time reflecting and learning from our past year we held space for each of us to talk about our hopes, dreams, doubts, audacious visions and questions. Each person in turn shared and then we gave feedback, asked clarifying questions, gave gentle, firm advice like “you can do this!” and “why you making yourself small? You the business!” or “You don’t have to choose, you can do it all!” or “We got you!” etc. etc. It was sweet. It was great to hear how much we were still on the same page in terms of our vision for weaving together art, pop culture, and social justice. We were also really honest and open about our fears and doubts. This was a really cathartic experience that allowed us to ease into big questions about our next year together. We found out that overall we are thinking deeply of the relationship between our professional and our creative lives and the degree of overlap or integration of these two really varies across the group. There was a shared interest in writing more, reflecting, traveling and learning from peers.

We thought about how each person’s vision might be integrated into the overall IM vision and framed our questions about IM in three main ways:

  1. What impact do we want to achieve in 2017? How would our individual lives and the lives of those we collaborate with in the broader creative community and social movement be better for having Intelligent Mischief in it?
     

  2. How did we want to be together? What are the ways of being, principles and values we want to uplift and be uplifted by in 2017?
     

  3. Who do we want to deepen connection and community with in 2017?

 

We thought of this approach because we wanted to have a strategic direction for our 2017 mischief that allowed for emergence, expansiveness, and individual and collective growth. We didn’t want to have too rigid a plan but wanted to know where we were heading, what vehicle we wanted to travel in, and who we wanted on board with us.

 

Impact: Where are we heading?

 

In 2017 we want greater recognition for the work that we do at the nexus of Black organizing and Black popular culture. This isn’t because we want to be famous per se but because we think this work and the analysis of it is extremely crucial for the particular times we live in.

We realized that as a collective or collaboratory the most immediate impact of the work we do as IM is on each of us as individuals. For 2017 we want IM to act as a space that helps each of us achieve our personal and creative life goals. We want it to be a vehicle for reaching a higher level in our craft and creative skills that provides opportunities for building new relationships, partnerships and collaborations. We also want to see the work we do as IM as being part of our critical response and analysis of social issues.


We want our work to be impactful and meaningful to other artists and activists of color as well, particularly black creatives and organizers. We want to collaborate on transformative cultural events and exchange of artist skills. We want to invite creatives to perform at our events and to co-curate events with us and deepen our connection to others who are thinking and making with similar ideas and visions. We want to work together to increase the effectiveness of black organizing using black culture to produce more beautiful and transformative works.

 

In the movement as a whole we want to contribute to culture shifting becoming increasingly beautiful and to the increase in the use of creativity and imagination to solve problems. We want to ground ourselves in our Blackness and Black culture and bring to light the vast diversity of Blackness particularly by sharing and revelling in our Caribbean culture.

 

Ways of Being: What’s our vehicle?

 

We know that it’s not enough for us to articulate a direction but that it’s equally as important to be attentive to the “how” of getting there. When you decide to go somewhere amazing, (for me that’s the beach), you can drive, you can take the bus, you can walk, you can ride a bike, etc. All of these modes of transportation make a difference in how you will experience the beach, how long it will take to get there, how many people are going with you, what the impact is of your trip to the beach, how enjoyable your trip is etc. Similarly we wanted to be very intentional about which tools, processes, approaches and practices we want to embody in the coming year.

 

One of the first things we articulated was the desire to be bold. We realized that we can be very shy about our work as well as sometimes too laid back. We felt that boldness would help us be very forward oriented especially given the audacity of some of our goals. We also want to be emergent, flexible, and fluid. Articulating intention, taking action but being open to the wisdom of the universe and its inhabitants in terms of exactly how we expect things to turn out. In 2017 we want to be intentional about our praxis and strike a balance between action and reflection. We want to make room for experimentation (after all, we do call ourselves a lab/collaboratory) so that we can balance the need and power of rapid prototyping new ideas with developing expertise and deep thinking. We feel it is important to take ourselves very seriously this year and really believe in our ideas and what we have to offer to the broader movement space even if no one else does. At minimum it is what we are spending so much of our time doing and that is serious enough.

 

We also feel that in 2017 it is extremely important to be able to identify when something is an individual project of one of our members or when it is a collective endeavor. This will allow us to know what our expectations are of each other, what capacity we have and will allow each person to move forward on their ideas without necessarily needing consensus. This will help improve our sense of clarity and our communication so that we feel free to share when we are working on side projects and cultivate a feeling that “All of us together are IM and each of us are IM.”

Who we want on board?

We did some dreaming about the types of relationships we want to have with organizations and individuals we want to be in deeper community and collaboration with in 2017. We want to cultivate relationships that overall will elevate and legitimize popular culture as essential to movement building including work with comic book artists, designers, curators, promoters, socially engaged artists, filmmakers, graphic designers, visual artists, DJs, musicians and more. We want to spend more time around people who inspire us because of the great work they have done, especially elders in our community. We also want to deepen our relationships with creatives in the Caribbean and and spend time in spaces that cultivate creative collaboration.

What exactly are we planning to do though?

With that vision and strategic direction established we literally had created a strategic filter to assess our ongoing projects and decide what to focus our energies on in 2017. We were surprised by a) how easy it was to get consensus and b) how easy it was to let go of some things when no one voted to work on it!

So, in 2017, our work will consist of:

  • Finishing the Black Body Survival Guide including publishing, launching, and going on tour.

  • Piloting the Black Body Survival Store and Black Body Survival Agency at the “Occupancies” exhibit at 808 Art Gallery at Boston University in February.

  • Fete Forward 2017 Edition

  • 3 Culture Hacks in Boston and then outside of Boston

  • A Liberation Lab in Boston and then outside of Boston

  • Going home to the Caribbean together (at least one island this year)

  • Shifting our consulting practice to focus on designing transformative experiences that support social change goals


Some of these projects are already underway and as we mentioned we are very excited to collaborate with other creative activists in the US and around the diaspora. Hit us up if that’s you!

Comment

LOVE, LIBERATION & LIMING: 10 TIPS FOR CULTURE SHIFTING FROM 2016

1 Comment

LOVE, LIBERATION & LIMING: 10 TIPS FOR CULTURE SHIFTING FROM 2016

2016 was an amazing leg in the Intelligent Mischief adventure. We laughed, we cried, we made new friends...Now, before you stop reading, please know that this isn’t your typical donation appeal letter. You’ve given to us all year round in so many ways and we’re already super grateful. We’ve also learned to operate on a very tiny budget, (amazing, I know!), so while we would appreciate a contribution at any time, this isn’t that ask. We’re sincerely processing our past year of mischief making, capturing our lessons and genuinely want to share those with you, especially if you’re pop culture nerds like we are. In no particular order, here are 10 tips for shifting culture for social change based on our experiences in 2016.

LESSON #1:
Channeling the trickster in social change work oftem means straddling many different modes of operating at the same time.

This year we moved as artists, consultants, facilitators, trainers, designers, and cultural organizers. We dug deep into our idea of ourselves as a col-lab-oratory/lab, truly fulfilling our mission by “experimenting with different forms of civil society” trying to learn where the sweet spot is at the nexus of popular culture and social change. Sometimes we brought creative strategies into social justice spaces like our work with Ujima Project and Movement NetLab and other times we ensured that social justice values and principles were guiding cultural production. Overall it was exhausting but dope and we’d do it all again!


LESSON #2: It takes approximately 2.5 years to write a book if you are not an experienced author.


Some of you know about the Black Body Survival Guide. For those who don’t know we often tell folks it’s a multi-media compilation of tips, tricks, and tools to survive with a black body in a so-called “post-racial” society. We’ve been working on the project since February 2014 in one form or another. We have convened over 200 people with black bodies to hack survival and started actually writing the book in the Summer of 2015. We wrapped content on the book and are doing some edits and a bit of formatting before we connect again with potential publishers. Along the way we met several independent authors who told us that they also took anywhere from 2.5 to 3 years to write their books after coming up with the initial concept. That made us feel extremely relieved! We also realized that we had the added challenge of figuring out how to write  a book collectively.

LESSON #3: Less talking more doing; less meeting more liming.

Right around the middle of 2016 we got really tired of meetings. It just felt like we needed to challenge the assumption that the secrets of social change were hidden in a long formal meeting somewhere. Now don’t get us wrong. We truly appreciate and understand the importance of meetings for getting work done but we felt that we were losing touch with the important aspect of social change work that involved just being with each other and with our people, having a good time, chilling, liming, eating, drinking, sharing a laugh etc. We also felt that we were spending so much time planning and that we needed desperately to just try things. To prototype and fail fast rather than creating the perfect plan for the perfect solution to an age old problem. So, in 2017 we want to do a little less talking and planning, and more doing, trying, experimenting and prototyping. We also want to do way fewer unnecessary meetings and just hang out and lime. Come to think of it, I bet most meetings are called because people just want to spend time together. Of course, this past year we launched our series of LIMES to bring people together, to connect, collaborate and uplift creatives of color in Boston. In 2017 we’re hoping to focus less on the programmatic goals of LIME and really find ways to spend quality time with the creatives and activists we love and admire, really get to know each other and strengthen our sweet community.

LESSON#4:
Black renaissance requires intellectuals, artists/creatives, and patrons.

As we explore what’s coming after Black Body Survival Guide we started thinking about Black Liberation and asking ourselves what is black liberation organizing. We were struck by the concept of Black Renaissance as a cultural movement that gives birth to a culture of liberation that makes liberation organizing and system change possible. As we nerded out on all this we found over and over the elements of Black Renaissance were popping up and tugging at our hems. We realized that there was something essential about naming the cultural moment, documenting it and then creating intentional networks of thought leaders, artists and culture makers and patrons/dedicated funders.

LESSON #5:
DJs are still saving lives on the dance floor.

“ Movies are real! Music is real! It affects people, it’s real...The other night I went to a club and I watched a DJ control and entire room. Even politicians can’t do that.” Prince Rogers Nelson.

This year we had the opportunity to collaborate with some of our favorite Boston DJs - [DJ Raq Starr, Oxycontinental, and Haro Caz] during our second Fete Forward Festival. We also hosted DJ Nomadik at our collaboration with MIT Media Lab to celebrate the life of Prince and the power of the cooperative movement during the Co-op Disco Tech. IM Collective member, Chrislene, also debuted as DJ BlVck No!ze. As part of our exploration of culture shifting we’re more convinced than ever about the important role of music makers, song writers and DJs in healing hearts, changing minds, and getting us moving for solidarity. In 2017 we’ll be working harder than ever to integrate sound, music, and dance as part of our social justice activism.

LESSON #6:

Sometimes the solutions aren’t always very clear and you just have to hack it.  

We went back to our original roots this year with four cultural hacks of our own in 2016. We co-facilitated a Reparations hack with Ed Whitfield from the Fund for Democratic Communities at the at the New Economy Commonbound conference in Buffalo, NY and another one at the Black Land & Liberation Initiative convening in Whitakers, North Carolina. We also co-facilitated an Anti-Displacement hack called Strategies for Staying Power at the Allied Media Conference in Detroit and did a Sci Fi for Social Change hack for students from Northeastern University. We also spent some time in experimentation and play with the Design Studio for Social Intervention during their weekly SPIT design sprints. We had so much fun prototyping and hacking creative solutions for social justice issues and are looking forward to hacking the heck out of 2017!

LESSON #7:
Small is beautiful.


Sometimes big things come in small packages. We received meaningful support in the form of small grants from RESIST foundation, the New England Grassroots Foundation and the Boston Impact Initiative. These contributions of $5,000 or less were just what we needed to test important ideas, focus our energies, and experiment with our business model. This enabled us to travel to attend amazing gatherings, strengthen our relationships with collaborators and spend time in deep reflection.

LESSON #8:
Access to space is essential for marginalized groups to maintain cultural visibility
.

In Boston, like most rapidly gentrifying cities, space is at a premium. We know that access to affordable space is what allows creatives and culture makers to thrive. Boston needs studio space, performance venues of different sizes, meeting space, exhibit space and more. This year we were grateful to discover new spaces and to spend time with other creatives at spaces like The Inner Sanctum, Make Shift Boston, and The Record Company. We also were able to have a writing retreat for BBSG at Old Oak Dojo. We’re grateful for these different types of spaces and are looking forward to liberating some more space in Boston in the coming year.


LESSON #9:
Networked social movements are the way forward
.

In the past year we strengthened our relationship with Movement Net Lab which is a think and do tank that studies and support the role of Decentralized Networks in Social Change Movements. We’re working with the Within Our Lifetime Network to uplift the stories of communities responding to racialized state violence in the hopes of catalyzing a translocal network of communities on the ground. We also attended the
BAJI conference and got to know the Black Immigration Network and joined the Art x Culture x Social Justice Network.

LESSON #10:
#LeadwithLove

 In September we attended the Movement Strategy Center Transition Lab in Mt. Madonna, California and experienced a week of deep spiritual connection and activation for social change that centered on strengthening embodied practice for social transformation. The MSC Transition Community is a Beloved Community of people that practices placing Love at the center of social transformation. Out of this community the transition community responded to the presidential election with the #LeadwithLove statement.
 

So those are our 10 tips we learned from this past year of culture shifting. We hope they can provide you with lessons for your own culture shifting projects. We would love to hear your thoughts on our tips or any culture shifting lessons you may have.

 

1 Comment

Hacking Gentrification: Strategies for Staying Power @ Allied Media Conference 2016

Comment

Hacking Gentrification: Strategies for Staying Power @ Allied Media Conference 2016

In the summer of 2016 we had the pleasure of collaborating with Allison Lin, Roberto Bedoya and Jess Solomon to host a Network Gathering at the Allied Media Conference in Detroit.

Together we held space for more than 100 anti-displacement activists from around the country to learn from each other, share stories of resistance, and use narrative and design to come up with creative solutions to fight Gentrification.

Check out our workshop description here --->>> WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

Check out pics from the workshop here --->>> PHOTOS!!

Comment

1 Comment

Hear our 2 cents on pop culture on SoundCloud

We have a SoundCloud account y'all! 

We're sharing our take on pop cultural happenings with a special emphasis on music, afro-futurism/sci-fi, movies, TV, social design, and thoughts on the projects we're working on. Listen to our take on M.I.A's borders song and Star Wars! Share and comment about what you think. 

Follow us at:  https://soundcloud.com/intelligent-mischief

1 Comment

Comment

New Year New We

Happy New Year! 

We're excited for 2016 at IM and for all the potential that it holds. Aisha shared some thoughts on the #BlackLivesMatter movement and how we can imagine what it means to win Black liberation.

"Across our social movements what we are struggling against is big and bad and ugly and insidious. It is deep and frightening and powerful. In order to win we will need to build new kinds of power, engage new people, and shift systems towards something we haven’t fully been free even to imagine. We therefore need to organize in new ways, envision a future we have never seen, and build new interim institutions that live the values of our movement. We need as much creativity as we can muster. We need to engage in (peaceful) guerrilla movement tactics that inspire our comrades and supporters, confuse and neutralize our enemies, and stimulate the hearts of those on the sidelines." ~ Aisha Shillingford 

Check it out her piece on Medium: https://medium.com/@aishashillingford/how-we-can-win-for-blacklives-in-2016-d083d1b0a1e8#.i64l24axc

~Chrislene DeJean

Comment

General Intern

Comment

General Intern

We, Intelligent Mischief, are a Boston-based creative design collective that works to: boost imagination and invention, realign action logic, and experiment with new forms of civil society to create atmospheres of change. We’re looking for an intern to support us in general for 10-15 hours a week from February 2016-July 2016. We are doing the most in 2016 so we’re in need of extra hands to help support us for broader organizational work. Currently we are working on the Black Body Survival Guide (seeking intern), our 2nd Fete Forward Festival (seeking intern), the IM Design School in the spring, a network gathering for the Allied Media Conference, and building our store.

This person would need to be available in person Monday afternoons for our general meetings about twice a month. We are looking for this intern to support us with our IM school, social media, and network gathering for the Allied Media Conference. This person will have experience in designing workshops, logistics, and social media. We are looking for someone to be hands on during our events/workshops meaning they need to document by live tweeting and help with set up. They will need to be available during some evenings for workshops. This person can take IM school classes for free, receive some IM store gear, and if funding permits, go to AMC with us.

Please send us an email detailing your experience and why you’re interested in this role to mischiefisintelligent@gmail.com. This can be a video, powerpoint, document, or a good old resume and cover letter. The more creative, the better. We are looking to start interviewing for all our internships during the first few weeks of January. We’re looking to have this position filled by February 1st 2016.

 

Comment

Black Body Survival Guide Intern

Comment

Black Body Survival Guide Intern

We, Intelligent Mischief, are a Boston-based creative design collective that works to: boost imagination and invention, realign action logic, and experiment with new forms of civil society to create atmospheres of change. We're looking for a project intern to assist us for about 10-15 hours a week starting in late January to June 2016. The Black Body Survival Guide is our multi-media project where we are gathering and creating satirical tips on how Black people can survive anti-Blackness in the U.S. The book is intentionally being written for Black people living in the United States. We are still in our writing stage of our project and we need support in preparing for our book launch and tour.

We need this person to be available Mondays and/or Fridays afternoons 12-6pm for our in-person planning meetings, hence, Boston-area based. This person will be tasked with overseeing the development of pre-tour workshops, setting up and managing the book tour, and managing social media for the Black Body Survival Guide. We need someone who is skilled in logistics, management, social media, and marketing. They need to make sure we are meeting our target audience during the tour and reaching them via social media. This person will receive some Black Body Survival gear, the Black Body Survival Guide, and may be monetarily compensated contingent on book and product sales.


Please send us an email detailing your experience and why you’re interested in this role to mischiefisintelligent@gmail.com. This can be a video, powerpoint, document, or a good old resume and cover letter. The more creative, the better. We are looking to start interviewing for all our internships during the first few weeks of January.

Comment

Fete Forward Intern

Comment

Fete Forward Intern

We, Intelligent Mischief, are a Boston-based creative design collective that works to: boost imagination and invention, realign action logic, and experiment with new forms of civil society to create atmospheres of change. We’re looking for an intern to help us ramp up for our 2nd Fete Forward Festival for 10-15 hours a week. Fete Forward is a mini-festival where we fete leading up to Carnival to explore the role and potential of the West Indian community in Boston and the importance of place by celebrating, uplifting and making visible and accessible the vast forms of West Indian culture through dance, conversation, mas making, folk story-telling, etc. The last festival we had was our first in 2014 where we featured legendary dancehall and reggae dancer and choreographer Blacka di Danca and musical genius DJ The Salivation Army. We believe that we can celebrate and decolonize at the same damn time! For this upcoming festival, we’re planning to expand on our last by possibly hosting a Caribbean Film and Arts Festival, Bringing out a Jouvay Band, and engaging the public in creating and experiencing Caribbean arts as a means to explore liberation.

We need this person to be available at about 5 - 10 hours per week and meet in person once per week.  You should be intimately aware of the Boston Carnival scene, and Caribbean culture, hence, you must be based in the Boston-area. We want an intern that loves West Indian culture, music, dance, film & carnival and understanding of the tradition. This intern will need experience in event planning, festival organizing, and some understanding of cultural organizing. The work will involve helping us draft up sponsorship letters, create objectives and outcomes, design and plan the festival, and liaise with artists, create outreach and promotional material, and document and archive the project. This person will be starting in January 2016 until September 2016.

Compensation TBD (contingent upon sponsorships and ticket sales).

Please email us an overview of your experience and why you’re interested in this role in any form, the more creative the better to us at mischiefisintelligent@gmail.com. We will be interviewing folks during the first few weeks of January.

 

Comment

Comment

We're Looking for a Social Media Intern

We, Intelligent Mischief, are a Boston-based creative design collective and lab whose mission is to boost invention + imagination, realign action logic and experiment with new forms for civil society in order to create atmospheres of change.

We do this by 1) applying human-centered design, story-based/narrative strategy, and the integration of arts and culture to consulting and training work with movement-focused organizations; 2) shifting culture by creating events, products and building a network of creatives engaged in social justice, and 3) designing multi-media experiments that explore new ways of organizing and movement-building.

We're looking for a social media intern to help increase our social media presence and implement our social media strategy which includes posting witty, relevant content on our social media accounts for 10-15 hours a week starting Tuesday October 13 - Friday December 18.

We need this person to be available at minimum on Monday afternoons between 12-6pm for our weekly in-person check in meetings, and available to attend our events and be part of our work, hence, you must be based in the Boston-area. We are currently located at Make Shift Boston. We do have flexibility around this person’s exact start and end time but it must in between those days and hours. We are looking for a social media savvy individual that has some experience doing social media posts that are social justice oriented, live tweeting, and documenting our events. Our social media posts come from a decolonized progressive analysis. We tend to post creative actions, some radical current events, and updates about our work. We prefer that this person have this internship count as work-study and/or school credit; we currently do not have the means to have a paid internship. We also prefer that you are able. interested or excited to work with a group of Black weirdos, have some creative background, and would join us in our daily twerk breaks.

Through this internship, this person will develop their communications skills, build liberatory analysis and knowledge around creative resistance. They will learn and practice anti-oppression work. They will have first hand experience of a Black led social justice collective and start up. There will be different learning opportunities through event planning, trainings, networking and possibly attending conferences. When money is good, we will occasionally take you out for lunch.

If you are interested, please send us your resume along with a short email cover letter demonstrating your experience to mischiefisintelligent@gmail.com. Creativity in this regard is a plus.

Comment

Comment

We're Looking for a Research Intern

We, Intelligent Mischief, are a Boston-based creative design collective that build projects and consult groups that develop atmosphere’s of change. We're looking for a research intern to assist us in researching for our Black Body Survival Guide for about 10-15 hours a week starting Tuesday October 13 - Friday December 18. The Black Body Survival Guide is our multi-media project where we are gathering satirical tips on how Black people can survive anti-Blackness in the U.S. Our satire is based on what is truly happening to Black folks and how the legacy of white supremacy, structurally oppress us so we need someone's help in getting the #facts. The structures we are discussing and building surrealist satirical tips include: police state, gentrification, climate change, gender politics, education, and more.

We need this person to be available Mondays and/or Fridays afternoons between 12-6pm for our in-person planning meetings, hence, you must be based in the Boston-area. Currently, we're located at Make Shift Boston. We do have flexibility around this person’s exact start and end time but it must in between those days and hours. We are looking for someone who has deep understanding of structural racism, and social justice oriented. They should some understanding of solidarity with different marginalized within the Black identity (i.e. Black trans and non-gender conforming folks). This person will also have expertise in research and a boss at citations. They will be able to critique, analyze, and discuss research. We prefer that this person have this internship count as work-study and/or school credit; we currently do not have the means to have a paid internship. We would like this person to have good organizational skills, some outreach skills, and note-taking. We also prefer that you can work with a group of Black weirdos, have some creative background, and would join us in our daily twerk breaks.

Through this internship, this person will develop their research skill, build liberatory analysis and knowledge around creative resistance. They will learn and practice anti-oppression work. They will have first hand experience of a Black led collective building an institution. There will be different learning opportunities through event planning, trainings, and possibly conferences. When money is good, we will occasionally take you out for lunch.

If you are interested, please send us your resume along with a short email cover letter demonstrating your experience to mischiefisintelligent@gmail.co

Comment

In Case You Missed It: Terry was on the "Research in the Movement" panel last week

Comment

In Case You Missed It: Terry was on the "Research in the Movement" panel last week

Terry Marshall, aka IM founder/Chief Strategy Architect, was on the "Research in the Movement: Civic Media, Political Unrest, and the role of the University" panel on Tuesday June 9th at the Microsoft NERD center. You know a panel is important when it has a colon in the title. The panel marked a closed to Emerson's Engagement Lab's Boston Civic Media conference. We played the role of decolonizing the space as well as having Terry speak about the role of organizers and activist in shifting the narrative on policing and anti-Blackness.

Check out the panel's transcript here

Comment

I.M. to participate in Uhuru: Black Liberation Lab

Comment

I.M. to participate in Uhuru: Black Liberation Lab

Every Tuesday in February, Intelligent Mischief will join other activist organizations and their allies at Uhuru: Black Liberation Lab hosted by Design Studio for Social Intervention (DS4SI).

DS4SI is dedicated to changing how social justice is imagined, developed and deployed here in the United States, and Uhuru: Black Liberation Lab is firmly in line with that mission.

This series will serve as "a creative action lab to explore the components of a deep fight for collective Black Liberation" and "provide Boston's Black activist leadership and their allies the opportunity to dream, brainstorm, and vision" around the next steps of action and strategy.

Uhuru: Black Liberation Lab will meet on Tuesdays from 5:30 to 8:00 pm at DS4SI, 1946 Washington Street, Roxbury, MA 02118.

This will be a significant part of I.M.'s actions commemorating Black History Month. Join us in helping to shape the progress of this vital movement. 

Comment

Terry Marshall leads session at MIT CoLab Workshop

1 Comment

Terry Marshall leads session at MIT CoLab Workshop

MIT CoLab just offered "The Story Behind a Question: Using Storytelling to Further Community Engagement" a workshop focused on exploring the intersection of storytelling, urban planning and community engagement.

On day four of the workshop, Terry Marshall, I.M.'s Strategy Architect led an exercise from the Center for Story Based Strategy that explored the five elements of a story and the important tension and difference between truth and meaning.

Terry used a hoax video broadcasted by the BBC in the UK on April Fool’s Day in 1957 to point out the difference between truth and meaning. He also used Star Wars to demonstrate how we can use the five elements of a story: conflict, imagery, foreshadowing, characters, and assumptions, to effectively tell a story and/or shape a narrative. Then he used these elements to help participants work through their own story creation processes.

Read more about the Story Behind a Question workshop and Terry's session on story telling frameworks.

Photo courtesy of @mitcolab on Flickr.

1 Comment

Chrislene DeJean joins USDAC's 2015 Cultural Agents Cohort

Comment

Chrislene DeJean joins USDAC's 2015 Cultural Agents Cohort

Chrislene DeJean, I.M.'s Creative Organizer, has been selected to join the second cohort of the U.S. Department of Arts and Culture's Cultural Agents.

As a Cultural Agent, Chrislene will be hosting an Imagining - a vibrant, arts-infused cross-cultural gathering of neighbors to envision a future when the full transformative power of art and culture has been integrated into the fabric of society, and identify ways to get there that harness latent artistic talent and local cultural resources.

Read about the Cultural Agent program on the USDAC website.

Photo courtesy of @usartsdept on Twitter.

Comment

2014 Year In Review

Comment

2014 Year In Review

In August 2013 I was being detained by the police for using chalk to pose the question “What if Boston…” on the sidewalk in front the statehouse. Just two months before had I left a community organizing job that had good pay and benefits to build my dream organization, Intelligent Mischief, to boost invention and imagination and realign action logic among social justice actors...

Comment

Chrislene DeJean featured in CityLine on WCVB-TV

Comment

Chrislene DeJean featured in CityLine on WCVB-TV

On December 14, I.M. Creative Organizer Chrislene DeJean appeared on CityLine on WCVB Channel 5 with Roxanne Longoria of the Boston NAACP Young Adult Committee.

Both ladies discussed youth and young adult activism in #BlackLivesMatter and the larger civil rights movement with CityLine host Karen Holmes Ward.

You can watch Chrislene's segment and access the the full episode on WCVB Channel 5.

Photo courtesy of WCVB-TV.

Comment

Intelligent Mischief featured in DigBoston as Key Players in Boston Protests

Comment

Intelligent Mischief featured in DigBoston as Key Players in Boston Protests

As part of their continuing coverage of the protests in the city, DigBoston profiled the key players helping to organize demonstrations against state brutality and social injustice. Intelligent Mischief and Deep Abiding Love were mentioned under the category of "The Activists Arts Front":


Straddling direct and artistic actions, organizers with Intelligent Mischief and Deep Abiding Love have hosted activist trainings and have also facilitated Ferguson-inspired street art as the growing protest storm fuels radical expression and vice versa. From a post by IM organizer Terry Marshall about their recent developments:
"These last few days Intelligent Mischief along with Deep Abiding Love and Design Studio 4 Social Intervention have had the pleasure of hosting St. Louis artist Damon Davis and his “All Hands on Deck” project in Boston. Thanks to many local Boston artists we were able to blast the town with street art that showed solidarity with people in Ferguson and make the connection to struggles in Boston. Last night we projected Damon’s hands up images and his "I Can’t Breathe" video on the side of the Harvard Law School building as a part of the National Day Of Resistance. Be on the look out for more street art and action design from Intelligent Mischief in the future."

Read the full article on DigBoston.

Comment

Comment

Terry Marshall describes the protests in Ferguson on French TV

Last month, I.M. Strategy Architect Terry Marshall described the aftermath of the non-indictment of Darren Wilson in Ferguson, MO.

While speaking to France 24 correspondent/host Francois Picard, he called for the St. Louis Police Department to show restraint in its response to the frustration of residents and protesters.

Comment

Terry describes the aftermath of #Ferguson Decision in DigBoston

Comment

Terry describes the aftermath of #Ferguson Decision in DigBoston

"At first about 200 people started marching, and the police were pretty much leaving people alone, and then people started marching toward the highway... They were literally just letting people march and backing off. Then, the march had grown to nearly 500 people, and they took over a highway.

Police later came, they brought out a tank, they brought out riot gear. [They] gave a lawful order to disperse, then people started marching near an intersection near a safe space… [and then] a tank came and started speeding up, and they were shooting smoke bombs..."

Comment